For Breakfast Trace Conversation Between Rock’s Left-Field and Jazz | Features

they were to eat breakfast, a band from London. We just released our second EP Trapped In The Big Room, which was the result of our attempt to discuss seven different people’s perspectives on post-rock and jazz in a network of psycho-pop, post-punk, dreams, etc. . We’re so proud of that, and the good guys at Clash have asked us to talk our perspective on what’s beyond rock and jazz and where, how and why you’re interrupting them.

Let’s get back.

When people talk about post-rock, they’re usually referring to the ultra-introspective upward blacksmiths who have come to define it – Mogwai, Sigur Ross, good luck to you! The Black Emperor et al. These bands have blasted the traditions and passions of rock into new forms in a way that is close to the spirit of the jazz creators, but you’d be hard-pressed to call any of them jazz. These were the bands we knew firsthand when some of us started making music together before we even had breakfast, and were originally inspired by us—besides Slint, we weren’t very familiar with the origins or the origins of post-rock music. Fearful players. When Jill joined the band, we started experimenting with some jazz outfits on our elusive approximation of the genre, and either by chance or fate that too when we first heard (or really heard) of the band that gave birth to the term – Park Psychosis.

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Their music remains untouchable, a perfectly executed vision of rock disjointed and distorted into something indescribably beautiful – and jazz is the beginning of that. Those polished drums, horns, roomy and crystalline productions, structures – they’re essential to their DNA. It can be a little frustrating to realize that the idea of ​​post-rock marriage with jazz is actually just a return to where it all began, but there are so many ways this approach can go – ours is just another one. This EP and our band in general are following each other into an area we’re individually less familiar with and learning how to feel comfortable playing there – something we’re still working on – and it seems to us that this approach our area is the same that has seeded and continues to define the vast landscape of post rock and experience.

cortex psychosis He is the best example of the point, but we’re not just fanatics of them. Other artists in this context that we draw from, are inspired by or who have been imprinted on us subconsciously are: turtle And the Don’t make say thinkboth exhibit barking psychosis and discussion discussion The “rock with jazz” syndrome of the second wave of post-rock music; Bardo Bond, who wanders through the wonderful and beautiful psychedelic fields with this gin flute as a guide; Steely Dan, original jazz rock musician; King Crimson, because of course.

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All of this mostly focuses on the more rock-inclined side of our influences, but in terms of the actual jazz that makes up Our Boys, we try to channel the angle of Thelonious Monk and Ornette Coleman in our writing, which appears particularly in Omar’s guitar parts. And like Ornette, we like to push and pull our tunes outside of the usual time constraints—we like to think they’re intentional, but if we’re being honest, it’s a natural byproduct of our own chaos. We have an openness to alternative instruments that are perhaps typically present in the jazz world. It took us a good few years to figure out how to integrate and arrange quieter instruments like the flute and saxophone while still retaining that explosive volume that comes from guitars. On our first record we had the nerve to cover the jazz standard, Nardis, and we’d love to do more – look for our record album “What’s Cookin”? “

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We’re slowly working to introduce improvisation into our playing, which is the soul of jazz, and we really can’t describe ourselves as jazz without this element. Our latest song, which has yet to be released, has a bit more interaction between the parts, and we’re working on it more in our live performance as well. Some jazz that tells us: Ornette Colemanan incomparable sonic adventurer who changed the music track with a plastic sax; Rafik Bhatiawhich disassembles and distorts standard jazz ammo through its spiral electronic lens; Bill Friesel, who makes six-string worlds and an enviable set of guitar pedals; The Cowboy Bebop soundtrack, because what’s more exciting than space, jazz, and noir battles?

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There are a lot of contemporary artists that we love that we see doing something similar to ours, or at least sharing the style of weaving jazz, post-rock, ocean, post-punk etc through each other. It’s certainly not what you would call a “scenery”, because we only know some of them as people, and they’re from all over the world, and at least one of these bands has died, but here it goes: our friends leather, which caused us when we first saw them in a real Spider-Man-Pointing-at-Spider-Man.jpg moment; Cahill/Costello, who cast a rhythmic anchor into the ocean of the sea; teke: tekewho suffers with theatrical ecstasy; young jesuswho are alternate world where Kristi Front Drive They were really into Sun Ra. single And the smart girl, who make the dubious distinction between rock and jazz useless to define; Caroline, a folktale dreamed up in an American bedroom in the Midwest; And of course Black country, new roadwho set the frighteningly high bar for all the very big orchestras practicing chords and saxophones.

All of this “remember some guys” feeds into our writing and recordings, so if you can draw lines between any of the above points and create a shape that you find interesting, check us out. We’ll be celebrating the release of Trapped In The Big Room on June 1st in London’s waiting room, with leather.head and nomorewillroam motivated – we’d love to see you there.

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The “Trapped In The Big Room” EP has now been released.

For Breakfast will play Waiting Room, London on June 1.

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